Get the dirt on California's Grittiest Real Estate Lending and Foreclosure law blog!

Palo Alto real estate attorney Julia Wei providing commentary & insight into trends in California real estate law & lending law, mortgages & foreclosures.

California Passes “Homeowner Bill of Rights” Legislation

July 2nd, 2012 · No Comments · California Lending & Mortgage Law, Current Affairs, Foreclosures, Residential Real Estate, Trust Deeds

 With much fanfare, the Attorney General's office announced today the passage of a collection of bills intended to protect homeowners who are attempting a loan modification.  

Among the key provisions, the statutes will:

-Require creditors to provide documentation to a borrower that establishes the creditor’s right to foreclose on real property prior to recording a notice of default.
-Require creditors to provide documentary evidence of ownership, the chain of title to real property, and the right to foreclose, at the time of the filing of a notice of default.
-Prohibit creditors from recording a notice of default when a timely-filed application for a loan modification or other loss mitigation measure is pending.
-Prohibit creditors from recording a notice of sale when a timely-filed application for a loan modification or other loss mitigation measure is pending.
-Prohibit creditors from recording a notice of sale while a borrower is in compliance with the terms of a trial loan modification or after another loss mitigation measure has been approved.
-Require creditors to disclose why an application for a loan modification or other loss mitigation measure has been denied.
-Require that notices of foreclosure sales be personally served, including notices of foreclosure sale postponement.
-Provide homeowners with a private right of action in instances in which the requirements set forth in the legislation are not followed.

These cluster of bills (Senate Bill 1470-74) will amend California Civil Code Section 2923.5 and 2924 (which is where the non-judicial foreclosure laws are located) and will add new sections: 2923.6, 2924.9, 2924.10, 2924.11, 2924.12, 2924.13, 2924.14, 2924.15, and 2924.16 to the Civil Code.

Perhaps the most important for consumers is that this legislation bars dual-tracking, which I have always considered to be a confusing and misleading process.

 The documentation required to "prove" that a lender has the right to foreclose seems a bit nebulous to me, but there is a list of suggested documents and the new process will require a statement setting forth the facts supporting why the beneficiary (or its agent or assignee) has the right to foreclose. These parts of the statute seem unduly burdensome. It would have been easier to default to what the bankruptcy court requires in the Proof of Claim process instead, which is pretty standardized at this point.

Share

Tags:

No Comments so far ↓

There are no comments yet...Kick things off by filling out the form below.

Leave a Comment